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SMOFlipid® Bag

Logo: SMOFlipid

When it comes to
innovations that nourish,
there’s only 1 SMOF

 

Supply of monounsaturated fatty acids

Mix of fatty acids may have less pro-inflammatory properties1

Omega-3 fatty acids from fish oil include EPA and DHA

First and only 4-oil lipid emulsion

 

SMOFlipid is the FIRST and ONLY 4-oil lipid injectable emulsion with demonstrated safety and tolerability2,3 in more than 6 million patients worldwide.*

Limitations of Use:

The omega-6: omega-3 fatty acid ratio and Medium Chain Triglycerides in SMOFlipid have not been shown to improve clinical outcomes compared to other intravenous lipid emulsions.

Important safety information> Full prescribing information>

*Data on file.

Caring for COVID-19 patients on PN

As an alternative ILE with four oil sources, SMOFlipid aligns with the most current SCCM/ASPEN guidance for COVID-19 patients requiring ICU care, which recommends limiting the use of pure soybean oil ILEs.4

 

Access the guidelines>

Benefits of the blend

Each oil has a special characteristic which provides a unique blend. Clinical studies have shown several benefits of the blend:

Improved liver function

SMOFlipid showed lower concentrations of liver enzymes (ALT, AST) compared to soybean oil lipid emulsions, indicating an improvement in the patient’s liver function.2,6

Monitor liver function. If SMOFlipid-treated patients develop liver test abnormalities, consider discontinuation or dose reduction.

Lower triglyceride increase

Triglyceride levels increased less with SMOFlipid compared to lipid emulsions with higher soybean oil content.5,6

Company-sponsored studies showed that mean triglyceride levels from baseline values to week 4 were similar in both the SMOFlipid and comparator groups.

Discover the SMOF Difference

  • Soybean oil 30% (omega-6)
    Provides essential fatty acids.

  • Medium-chain triglycerides (MCT) 30% A source of rapidly available energy.7

  • Olive oil 25% (omega-9)
    Supplies monounsaturated fatty acids.

  • Fish oil 15% (omega-3)
    A source of EPA and DHA.8

Get your quick reference guide for additive compatibility and stability information for SMOFlipid.

 

Indications and limitations of use

Indication:

SMOFlipid is indicated in adults as a source of calories and essential fatty acids for parenteral nutrition when oral or enteral nutrition is not possible, insufficient, or contraindicated.

 

Limitations of Use:

The omega-6:omega-3 fatty acid ratio and Medium Chain Triglycerides in SMOFlipid have not been shown to improve clinical outcomes compared to other intravenous lipid emulsions.

 
  

SMOFlipid resources

Explore additional SMOFlipid materials by
visiting our Resource Center.

  

  

Expand

DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION

The recommended daily dosage in adults is 1 to 2 grams/kg per day and should not exceed 2.5 grams/kg per day. SMOFlipid 1000 mL is supplied as a Pharmacy Bulk Package for admixing only and is not for direct infusion. Prior to administration, transfer to a separate PN container. Protect the admixed PN solution from light.

CONTRAINDICATIONS

Known hypersensitivity to fish, egg, soybean, or peanut protein, or to any of the active ingredients or excipients.
Severe hyperlipidemia or severe disorders of lipid metabolism with serum triglycerides > 1,000 mg/dL.

WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS

  • Death in Preterm Infants: (see BLACK BOX WARNING)
  • Hypersensitivity Reactions: SMOFlipid contains soybean oil, fish oil, and egg phospholipids, which may cause hypersensitivity reactions. Cross reactions have been observed between soybean and peanut oil. Signs or symptoms of a hypersensitivity reaction may include: tachypnea, dyspnea, hypoxia, bronchospasm, tachycardia, hypotension, cyanosis, vomiting, nausea, headache, sweating, dizziness, altered mentation, flushing, rash, urticaria, erythema, pyrexia, or chills. If a hypersensitivity reaction occurs, stop infusion of SMOFlipid immediately and undertake appropriate treatment and supportive measures.
  • Risk of Catheter-Related Infections: Lipid emulsions, such as SMOFlipid, can support microbial growth and is an independent risk factor for the development of catheter-related bloodstream infections. The risk of infection is increased in patients with malnutrition-associated immunosuppression, long-term use and poor maintenance of intravenous catheters, or immunosuppressive effects of other concomitant conditions or drugs.
  • Fat Overload Syndrome: This is a rare condition that has been reported with intravenous lipid emulsions. A reduced or limited ability to metabolize lipids accompanied by prolonged plasma clearance may result in a syndrome characterized by a sudden deterioration in the patient’s condition including fever, anemia, leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, coagulation disorders, hyperlipidemia, fatty liver infiltration (hepatomegaly), deteriorating liver function, and central nervous system manifestations (e.g., coma).
  • Refeeding Syndrome: Reintroducing calories and protein to severely undernourished patients with PN may result in the refeeding syndrome, characterized by the intracellular shift of potassium, phosphorus, and magnesium as the patient becomes anabolic. Thiamine deficiency and fluid retention may also develop.
  • Aluminum Toxicity: SMOFlipid contains no more than 25 mcg/L of aluminum. During prolonged PN administration in patients with renal impairment, the aluminum levels in the patient may reach toxic levels. Preterm infants are at greater risk because their kidneys are immature, and they require large amounts of calcium and phosphate solutions, which contain aluminum. Patients with renal impairment, including preterm infants, who receive parenteral intakes of aluminum at greater than 4 to 5 mcg/kg/day can accumulate aluminum to levels associated with central nervous system and bone toxicity. Tissue loading may occur at even lower rates of administration of PN products.
  • Risk of Parenteral Nutrition-Associated Liver Disease (PNALD): PNALD has been reported in patients who receive PN for extended periods of time, especially preterm infants, and can present as cholestasis or steatohepatitis. The exact etiology is unknown and is likely multifactorial. Intravenously administered phytosterols (plant sterols) contained in plant-derived lipid formulations have been associated with development of PNALD, although a causal relationship has not been established. If SMOFlipid-treated patients develop liver test abnormalities, consider discontinuation or dose reduction.
  • Hypertriglyceridemia: Impaired lipid metabolism with hypertriglyceridemia may occur in conditions such as inherited lipid disorders, obesity, diabetes mellitus, and metabolic syndrome.
  • Monitoring/Laboratory Tests: Routinely monitor serum triglycerides, fluid and electrolyte status, blood glucose, liver and kidney function, blood count including platelets, and coagulation parameters throughout treatment. Monitoring patients for signs and symptoms of essential fatty acid deficiency (EFAD) is recommended.
  • Interference with Laboratory Tests: Content of vitamin K may counteract anticoagulant activity. The lipids contained in this emulsion may interfere with some laboratory blood tests (e.g., hemoglobin, lactate dehydrogenase [LDH], bilirubin, and oxygen saturation) if blood is sampled before lipids have cleared from the bloodstream.

ADVERSE REACTIONS

Most common adverse drug reactions >1% of patients who received SMOFlipid from clinical trials were nausea, vomiting, hyperglycemia, flatulence, pyrexia, abdominal pain, increased blood triglycerides, hypertension, sepsis, dyspepsia, urinary tract infection, anemia and device-related infection.

Less common adverse reactions in ≤ 1% of patients who received SMOFlipid were dyspnea, leukocytosis, diarrhea, pneumonia, cholestasis, dysgeusia, increased blood alkaline phosphatase, increased gamma-glutamyltransferase, increased C-reactive protein, tachycardia, liver function test abnormalities, headache, pruritis, dizziness, rash and thrombophlebitis.

The following adverse reactions have been identified during post-approval use of SMOFlipid in countries where it is registered. Infections and Infestations: infection. Respiratory, Thoracic and Mediastinal Disorders: dyspnea.

To report SUSPECTED ADVERSE REACTIONS, contact Fresenius Kabi USA, LLC, at 1-800-551-7176, option 5, or FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088 or www.fda.gov/medwatch.

DRUG INTERACTIONS

Coumarin and Coumarin Derivatives, Including Warfarin: Anticoagulant activity may be counteracted; monitor laboratory parameters.

USE IN SPECIFIC POPULATIONS

  • Pregnancy and Lactation: There are no available data on risks associated with SMOFlipid when used in pregnant or lactating women.
  • Pediatric Use: The safety and effectiveness of SMOFlipid have not been established in pediatric patients.
  • Hepatic Impairment: Parenteral nutrition should be used with caution in patients with hepatic impairment. Hepatobiliary disorders are known to develop in some patients without preexisting liver disease who receive PN, including cholestasis, hepatic steatosis, fibrosis and cirrhosis (PN associated liver disease), possibly leading to hepatic failure.

OVERDOSE

In the event of an overdose, fat overload syndrome may occur. Stop the SMOFlipid infusion until triglyceride levels have normalized. The effects are usually reversible by stopping the lipid infusion. If medically appropriate, further intervention may be indicated. Lipids are not dialyzable from serum.

Expand

DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION

The recommended daily dosage in adults is 1 to 2 grams/kg per day and should not exceed 2.5 grams/kg per day. SMOFlipid 1000 mL is supplied as a Pharmacy Bulk Package for admixing only and is not for direct infusion. Prior to administration, transfer to a separate PN container. Protect the admixed PN solution from light.

CONTRAINDICATIONS

Known hypersensitivity to fish, egg, soybean, or peanut protein, or to any of the active ingredients or excipients.
Severe hyperlipidemia or severe disorders of lipid metabolism with serum triglycerides > 1,000 mg/dL.

WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS

  • Death in Preterm Infants: (see BLACK BOX WARNING)
  • Hypersensitivity Reactions: SMOFlipid contains soybean oil, fish oil, and egg phospholipids, which may cause hypersensitivity reactions. Cross reactions have been observed between soybean and peanut oil. Signs or symptoms of a hypersensitivity reaction may include: tachypnea, dyspnea, hypoxia, bronchospasm, tachycardia, hypotension, cyanosis, vomiting, nausea, headache, sweating, dizziness, altered mentation, flushing, rash, urticaria, erythema, pyrexia, or chills. If a hypersensitivity reaction occurs, stop infusion of SMOFlipid immediately and undertake appropriate treatment and supportive measures.
  • Risk of Catheter-Related Infections: Lipid emulsions, such as SMOFlipid, can support microbial growth and is an independent risk factor for the development of catheter-related bloodstream infections. The risk of infection is increased in patients with malnutrition-associated immunosuppression, long-term use and poor maintenance of intravenous catheters, or immunosuppressive effects of other concomitant conditions or drugs.
  • Fat Overload Syndrome: This is a rare condition that has been reported with intravenous lipid emulsions. A reduced or limited ability to metabolize lipids accompanied by prolonged plasma clearance may result in a syndrome characterized by a sudden deterioration in the patient’s condition including fever, anemia, leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, coagulation disorders, hyperlipidemia, fatty liver infiltration (hepatomegaly), deteriorating liver function, and central nervous system manifestations (e.g., coma).
  • Refeeding Syndrome: Reintroducing calories and protein to severely undernourished patients with PN may result in the refeeding syndrome, characterized by the intracellular shift of potassium, phosphorus, and magnesium as the patient becomes anabolic. Thiamine deficiency and fluid retention may also develop.
  • Aluminum Toxicity: SMOFlipid contains no more than 25 mcg/L of aluminum. During prolonged PN administration in patients with renal impairment, the aluminum levels in the patient may reach toxic levels. Preterm infants are at greater risk because their kidneys are immature, and they require large amounts of calcium and phosphate solutions, which contain aluminum. Patients with renal impairment, including preterm infants, who receive parenteral intakes of aluminum at greater than 4 to 5 mcg/kg/day can accumulate aluminum to levels associated with central nervous system and bone toxicity. Tissue loading may occur at even lower rates of administration of PN products.
  • Risk of Parenteral Nutrition-Associated Liver Disease (PNALD): PNALD has been reported in patients who receive PN for extended periods of time, especially preterm infants, and can present as cholestasis or steatohepatitis. The exact etiology is unknown and is likely multifactorial. Intravenously administered phytosterols (plant sterols) contained in plant-derived lipid formulations have been associated with development of PNALD, although a causal relationship has not been established. If SMOFlipid-treated patients develop liver test abnormalities, consider discontinuation or dose reduction.
  • Hypertriglyceridemia: Impaired lipid metabolism with hypertriglyceridemia may occur in conditions such as inherited lipid disorders, obesity, diabetes mellitus, and metabolic syndrome.
  • Monitoring/Laboratory Tests: Routinely monitor serum triglycerides, fluid and electrolyte status, blood glucose, liver and kidney function, blood count including platelets, and coagulation parameters throughout treatment. Monitoring patients for signs and symptoms of essential fatty acid deficiency (EFAD) is recommended.
  • Interference with Laboratory Tests: Content of vitamin K may counteract anticoagulant activity. The lipids contained in this emulsion may interfere with some laboratory blood tests (e.g., hemoglobin, lactate dehydrogenase [LDH], bilirubin, and oxygen saturation) if blood is sampled before lipids have cleared from the bloodstream.

ADVERSE REACTIONS

Most common adverse drug reactions >1% of patients who received SMOFlipid from clinical trials were nausea, vomiting, hyperglycemia, flatulence, pyrexia, abdominal pain, increased blood triglycerides, hypertension, sepsis, dyspepsia, urinary tract infection, anemia and device-related infection.

Less common adverse reactions in ≤ 1% of patients who received SMOFlipid were dyspnea, leukocytosis, diarrhea, pneumonia, cholestasis, dysgeusia, increased blood alkaline phosphatase, increased gamma-glutamyltransferase, increased C-reactive protein, tachycardia, liver function test abnormalities, headache, pruritis, dizziness, rash and thrombophlebitis.

The following adverse reactions have been identified during post-approval use of SMOFlipid in countries where it is registered. Infections and Infestations: infection. Respiratory, Thoracic and Mediastinal Disorders: dyspnea.

To report SUSPECTED ADVERSE REACTIONS, contact Fresenius Kabi USA, LLC, at 1-800-551-7176, option 5, or FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088 or www.fda.gov/medwatch.

DRUG INTERACTIONS

Coumarin and Coumarin Derivatives, Including Warfarin: Anticoagulant activity may be counteracted; monitor laboratory parameters.

USE IN SPECIFIC POPULATIONS

  • Pregnancy and Lactation: There are no available data on risks associated with SMOFlipid when used in pregnant or lactating women.
  • Pediatric Use: The safety and effectiveness of SMOFlipid have not been established in pediatric patients.
  • Hepatic Impairment: Parenteral nutrition should be used with caution in patients with hepatic impairment. Hepatobiliary disorders are known to develop in some patients without preexisting liver disease who receive PN, including cholestasis, hepatic steatosis, fibrosis and cirrhosis (PN associated liver disease), possibly leading to hepatic failure.

OVERDOSE

In the event of an overdose, fat overload syndrome may occur. Stop the SMOFlipid infusion until triglyceride levels have normalized. The effects are usually reversible by stopping the lipid infusion. If medically appropriate, further intervention may be indicated. Lipids are not dialyzable from serum.

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References: 1. Vanek VW, et al. A.S.P.E.N. position paper: Clinical role for alternative intravenous fat emulsions. Nutr Clin Pract. 2012;27(2):150-192. 2. Klek S, et al. Four-week parenteral nutrition using a third-generation lipid emulsion (SMOFlipid): a double-blind, randomised, multicentre study in adults. Clin Nutr. 2013;32(2):224-231. 3. Mertes N, et al. Safety and efficacy of a new parenteral lipid emulsion (SMOFlipid) in surgical patients: a randomized, double-blind, multicenter study. Ann Nutr Metab. 2006;50(3):253-259. 4. Martindale R, Patel JJ, Taylor B, Warren M, McClave SA. Nutrition therapy in the patient with COVID-19 disease requiring ICU care. Joint Recommendations from SCCM and ASPEN. Published online at https://www.sccm.org/COVID19RapidResources/Resources/Nutrition-Therapy-in-the-Patient-with-COVID-19-Dis. Updated April 1, 2020. Accessed January 13, 2021. 5. Donoghue V. Schleicer GK Spruyt MGL., et al. Four-oil lipid intravenous lipid emulsion effect on plasma fatty acid composition, inflammatory markers and clinical outcomes in acutely ill patients: A randomized control trial (Foil fact) Clin Nutr. 2018 doi:10.1016/jclnu.2018.12.010. (Epub ahead of print) 6. Antébi H, et al. Liver function and plasma antioxidant status in intensive care unit patients requiring total parenteral nutrition: comparison of 2 fat emulsions. JPEN J Parenter Enteral Nutr. 2004;28(3):142-148. 7. Deckelbaum RJ, et al. Medium-chain versus long-chain triacylglycerol emulsion hydrolysis by lipoprotein lipase and hepatic lipase: implications for the mechanisms of lipase action. Biochemistry (Mosc). 1990;29(5):1136-1142. 8. Kalish BT, Fallon EM, Puder M. JPEN J Parenter Enteral Nutr. 2012;36:380-8.